Featured courses are a selection of innovative and interdisciplinary courses, minor or certificate programs, and announcements of unique summer electives. Many courses are new, new to summer, or are returning to summer after a gap. Others focus on diversity or current global, environmental, or cultural issues trends.

Many of these courses will be offered again online and remotely in summer session 2021 with registration through RAMweb. For a complete interactive view of summer courses, please visit Courses at a Glance.

Please note: Please confim the course delivery method in RAMweb. The CSU Pandemic Preparedness Team has received permission to move a number of campus courses to campus or hybrid delivery. Changes are in process for a selection of large-section of  100 level AUCC courses; assessment of other low-enrollment courses which can return to campus will be ongoing.

Bulletin Board

New, new-to-summer, and courses for minors and certificate programs

Explore courses fitting your interests and goals with these summer course flyers from departments. Degree-seeking main campus students register through RAMweb. Additional information about many of these courses is available below in the listings by term within summer session.

Second 4-Week Session: June 14 – July 11, 2021

Students may generally add courses in this session through Wednesday, June 16, 2021; please check RAMweb for specifics.

IDEA 210: Introduction to Design Thinking (AUCC 3B)

Credits: 3

Description: Design thinking is a creative, flexible process that fosters innovation. Content and projects promote building creative competence and an appreciation for thinking across disciplines to develop a new mindset and skillset that guides innovation. Learning tools to develop compelling ideas for meaningful societal and marketplace impact will be explored. Learn the principles of design thinking in practice with opportunities to work on real-world issues for companies like the Food Bank of Larimer County, Defy Colorado and Target Corp. Credit not allowed for both IDEA 210 and IDEA 280A1.

Learn about earning a certificate or minor in Design Thinking.

Pre requisite: None

Delivery: Face-to-Face and Online sections available

Registration: Must also register for lab

Instructor: Maria Delgado

Communication in Rome Reimagined

These two courses will provide students with a vivid intercultural experience, focusing on Italian history, art, architecture, cinema, popular music, cultural values and mores, and gender roles.

Both courses feature regular and meaningful interactions with the professors and classmates. Students may take either class, or take both classes simultaneously because they will complement each other extensively. Each course can be taken as Honors classes (listed as HONR 392 and 492) or Communication Studies classes.

SPCM 381A3: Virtual Bridging of Cultures: Italy/USA

Credits: 3

Description: This course will familiarize you with theory, concepts, principles, research methods, and practical skills in the areas of intercultural and cross-cultural communication, construction and negotiation of Italian identity (italianità), and strategies of an effective dialogue with a global mindset. The aim of the course is to transform its participants into culturally aware and skilled critical citizens with a profound understanding of the phenomenon of Italian national identity and rigorous experience of cultural bridging.

Photos used with permission of Carl Burgchardt.

Prerequisite: SPCM 100 to 499 – at least 3 credits

Delivery: Online with specific meeting times.

Instructor:  Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager

SPCM 481A3: A Cinematic Voyage to Rome, Italy

Credits: 3

Description: During our virtual voyage, students will analyze critically acclaimed films that are set in Rome, Italy, with special emphasis on cinematic representations of famous Roman monuments, buildings, fountains, and streetscapes. In addition, we will consider cinema as an expression of national or international culture, aesthetics, values, and politics, and explain the worldwide significance of the Italian film industry. This class counts toward the minor in Film Studies.

Photos used with permission of Carl Burgchardt.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SPCM 100 to 499 – at least 3 credits.

Delivery: Online with specific meeting times.

Instructor: Carl Burgchardt

Second 8-Week Session: June 14 – August 8, 2021

Students may add courses in this session through Monday, June 21, 2021. Please check RAMweb for specifics.

Students outdoors in CSU Community Sustainability Workshop

GES 135: Applied Community Sustainability

Credits: 3

Through GES135, CSU students have been hard at work on behalf of communities in Colorado and elsewhere, developing practical solutions to questions of sustainability. Through this real-world, project-based course, students have gained hands-on experience identifying problems and developing thoughtful solutions related to diverse issues, including equitable access to nature, transportation, education, and food.

Delivery: Face-to Face

Contact: Kristina.Yelinek@colostate.edu

FTEC 360: Brewing Processes

Credits: 4

Description: Influence of raw material selection, malting, mashing, boiling, and fermentation on quality of beverages.

Registration Information: Junior standing.
Must also register for recitation.

Prerequisites: CHEM 245; FTEC 210 or concurrent registration

Delivery: Online

Instructors: Jeffrey Callaway (Primary), Charlie Hoxmeier

Globalization Word Cloud: connectedness, colonialism, interdependence, diffusion, future, responsibility, etc.

INST 200: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Globalization

Credits: 3

Description: Narratives, or stories, not only inform the way we understand the world, but can shape the world itself. This new course offers an interdisciplinary study of globalization through narrative, including stories, rhetoric, discourse, ideas, literature, and language about globalization. We’ll dive into relevant methods in international and global studies, and literary studies, which will deepen our knowledge of globalization and the world while promoting diversity and cultural awareness.

Prerequisite: CO 150

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Andrea Duffy

JTC 328: Feature Writing

Credits: 3

Description: Learn to craft memorable stories for all media about interesting people and specialized interests including travel, leisure, art, nature, sports, food, music, work, careers, environment, technology, and health, among others.

Prerequisites: JTC 210

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Kimberly Spencer

mountain lupines, LIFE 102

LIFE 102: Attributes of Living Systems (GT-SC1)

Credits: 4 credits with lab; may not enroll if have completed BZ 101 or BZ 104.

Description: LIFE 102 is an introductory biology course intended to provide a basis for more-advanced courses in life sciences. The objective of this course is to give an overview of the many features that are common to living organisms, with special focus on the topics of chemistry, cell biology, genetics, and evolution. Must register for lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisite: None. Strongly recommend high school chemistry or equivalent.

Delivery: Online

Photo: This natural population of lupines, Lupinus, exhibits considerable variation in flower color. Individual differences are inherited and passed on to offspring.

Instructor: Eric Anthun

Third 4-Week Session: July 12-August 8, 2021

Students may generally add courses in this session through Wednesday, July 14, 2021. Please check RAMweb for specifics.

ART 281A3: Graphic Design for Non-Art Majors

Credits:  3 (with recitation)

Description: Identify and apply knowledge, skills, and software related to the practice of graphic design and visual communications. Explore the structures, processes, and technical tools of graphic design. Apply skills in typography and typesetting, page layout, semiotics, concept development, and innovative software utilized in the field of graphic design.

Prerequisite: None

Delivery: Mixed Face-to-Face (Hybrid)

Instructor: Roberto Muntoreanu

ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics Online (AUCC 3C)

Credits: 3, with recitation

Description: Introduction to decision-making by households, firms, and government, and resulting allocation of resources through markets.

Prerequisite: Math (see RAMweb)

Delivery: Face-to-Face

Instructor: Anna Poerbonegoro

ECON 204: Principles of Macroeconomics Online (AUCC 3C)

Credits: 3, with recitation

Description: Introduction to decision-making by households, firms, and government, and resulting allocation of resources through markets.

Prerequisite: Math (see RAMweb)

Delivery: Face-to-Face

Instructor: Debora Nunes

ETST 332: Contemporary Chicanx Issues

Credits: 3

Description: Current Chicanx issues including conquest, immigration, urbanization, health in context of societal trends.

Prerequisite: None

Delivery: Online, 2-4 p.m. Mon-Friday

Instructor: LeRoy Saiz

IDEA 310A: Design Thinking Toolbox: Paper Products

Credits: 1

Description: Learn how to design, iterate, prototype, and engineer with the simple, yet amazingly versatile, material called paper. We’ll learn to fold, joint, connect and construct functional objects and products as we push the limits of what paper can become.

Learn about earning a certificate or minor in Design Thinking.

Prerequisite: IDEA 210 or concurrent registration

Delivery: Face-to-Face

Instructor: Mark Schreiber

IDEA 310J: Graphic Noveling

Credits: 1

Description:This course provides a base for creating visual stories using sequential art. Using design thinking from ideation to prototype, students will communicate a design proposal in graphic novel format.

Learn about earning a certificate or minor in Design Thinking.

Prerequisite: IDEA 210 or concurrent registration

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Robert Work

IDEA 310K: Design Thinking Toolbox: Technical Sketching and Illustration

Credits: 1

Description:This course provides a base for you learning expanded view sketching. Using design thinking from ideation to prototype, students will communicate their designs through detailed, technical sketches.

Learn about earning a certificate or minor in Design Thinking.

Prerequisite: IDEA 210 or concurrent registration

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Robert Work

IDEA 310N: Design Thinking Toolbox: Post-Digital Imaging/Printmaking 

Credits: 1

Description: Employing design thinking theories and methods to projects using post-digital imaging that promotes “iterative tinkering” through the exploration of various design processes related to screen-printing and other forms of post-digital imaging. Learn new skills using Adobe Creative Suite and become more efficient in using the equipment in the Prototyping Lab.

Learn about earning a certificate or minor in Design Thinking.

Prerequisite: IDEA 210 or concurrent registration

Delivery: Face-to-Face

Instructor: Johnny Plastini

SPCM 200: Public Argumentation

Credits:  3

Description: Key communication principles for democracy, including issue analysis, evidence, reasoning, decision-making, debate, dialogue, and deliberation.

Delivery: Online

Prerequisite: SPCM  200

Instructor: Usama Alshaibi

SPCM 360: The Personal Lens — Making Media

Credits:  3

Description: Harnessing smart phone technology to produce video; telling personal stories via video that engage local and global communities; exploring traditional and novel forms of storytelling, representation, documentary, media appropriation, and cultural jamming in the context of fair use; using the internet to distribute self-produced content and communicate with audiences.

Prerequisite: None, sophomore standing.

Instructor: Usama Alshaibi

Additional Varying-Length Terms

Students may add courses in this session through the add/drop date for each class as listed in RAMweb.

Linking to PHIL 345: Environmental Ethics webpage

PHIL 345: Environmental Ethics

When: July 25-August 7, 2021

This is a two-week course at the CSU Mountain Campus. Students may add this class up to the add/drop date listed in RAMweb.

Credits: 3

A philosophical perspective on the ethical dimensions of humankind’s complicated relationship with our natural environment.

Please contact Professor Ken Shockley for an override for registering, information, and questions.

First 4-Week Session: May 17 – June 13, 2021

Students may generally add courses in this session through Wednesday, May 19, 2021. Please check RAMweb for details about specific courses.

Winged insect, BZ100 Principles of Animal Biology

BZ 110: Principles of Animal Biology (GT-SC2)

Credits: 3

An introductory and broad survey of animal biology at different levels of organization, starting from genes and cells all the way up to populations and communities. Taking an evolutionary perspective, the course will take you on a tour of animal diversity, focusing on their structure and function and the fundamental biological mechanisms that explain these processes. The objective of this course is to learn both the basic set of terminology and concepts that you need to take upper level biology classes and to develop your critical thinking ability which is critical to the scientific process.

Prerequisites: None

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Karen Raines

Bee and cosmos flower-Life 103 Organismal Biology

LIFE 103: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants (GT-SC1)

Credits: 4 credits with lab; may not enroll if have completed BZ 101 or BZ 104.

Organismal Biology provides an overview of trends in the evolution of life on earth, the evolutionary relationships among major groups of organisms, and the amazing physiological and structural adaptations of these organisms in response to the challenges of living on this planet. The exploration of diversity, trends, and physiology in Organismal Biology prepares students for advanced coursework in genetics, evolution, physiology, zoology, and other disciplines.

Prerequisites: None

Delivery: Online

Contact: Tamla Blunt

JTC 425: Strategic Multicultural Communication

Credits: 3

Description:  Identify, formulate and implement effective strategies in integrated advertising and communication campaigns to effectively connect with individuals of Hispanic/Latino, African-American and Asian descent as well as the LGBT sub-segments of the general market in the U.S.; consideration of the globalized marketplace and consumers across under-served markets internationally.

Prerequisites: JTC 326, Junior standing

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Tori Arthur

First 8-Week Session: May 17 – July 11, 2021

Students may generally add courses in this session through Monday, May 24, 2021. Please check RAMweb for details about specific courses.

"Keep Dreaming" message on background of colorful layers of train graffiti

ANTH 358: Archaeologies of Graffiti 

May 17 – July 11, 2021 (First 8-week session)

Credits: 3

Description: The modern story of graffiti revolving around social, economic, and political contexts such as bathroom stalls, subways and alleys steeped with urine and trash, decrepit buildings and train cars situated in less reputable areas of cities and towns lead people to associate it with antisocial behaviors, dissent, and the vandalism of public and private property. However, some people consider graffiti as a legitimate form of art, communication, and a somewhat anonymous expression of current social climates. The disparity between these two perspectives has provided a great deal to study for social scientists. However, a consideration of graffiti’s simple definition words or drawings etched or painted on some surf ace in a public place lead us to recognize that feats of graffiti
originate way before the inner city movements of the 1970s. In this class we will draw upon a range of studies from archaeology, anthropology, sociology, art, and history to broadly explore the creation and meaning of graffiti from antiquity to the present. Our goal is to learn how to examine the form, function, and c ont ext of graffiti across cultures and through time, with regard to the circumstances of its creation. In doing so, we aspire to better understand what lies behind the human urge to leave a mark.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100, ANTH 120, ANTH 140 or ANTH 200

Delivery: Online

Instructor: edward.henry@colostate.edu

Baboon portrait, BZ100 Humans and Other Animals

BZ 101: Humans and Other Animals (GT-SC2)

May 17 – July 11, 2021 (First 8-week session)

Credits: 3

Description: This biology course is intended for non-science majors.  The DNA molecule is the blueprint of life and it is with this premise that BZ 101 will explore: common life processes, form and function of the human body, evolution and biodiversity. Many current and controversial socio-scientific issues, related to course content, will also be addressed.

Photo: Humans share about 94% of their DNA with baboons. Their genetic and physiologic similarities with humans makes baboons excellent research models for the study of numerous human diseases including heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.

Prerequisites: None

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Karen Raines

JTC 270: Analyzing Data in Journalism

Credits: 3

Description: Application of quantitative concepts and methodologies of data analysis to investigation of media and communication problems.

Prerequisite: None.

Delivery: Online

Registration: Sophomore standing. Must also register for lab.

Instructor: Yeung Eun Park

JTC 347: Audio Production

Credits: 3

Description: Principles of audio recording, production, and editing by recording music and creating audio journalism.

Prerequisite: JTC 210 (Newswriting). Juniors and Seniors only.

Delivery: Face-to-Face

Instructor: Hannah Copeland

JTC 371: Publications Design and Production

Credits: 3

Description: Principles of producing publications for print and electronic delivery, including newspapers, magazines, newsletters, brochures, and printed ephemera.

Prerequisite: JTC 211 (Visual Communication)

Delivery: Online

Instructor: Jenny Fisher

NR 400: Public Communication in Natural Resources

Credits:  3 (with recitation)

Description: Examine how public communication shapes opinion and understanding of natural resource issues. Combines study of key communication concepts with experiential projects, including critique of a public hearing and creation of media products. Through readings, case studies, and assignments, analyze approaches for effective public communication. Design brochures, websites, videos, etc., eventually collaborating in teams with real-life ‘clients’.

Prerequisite: CO 300 or CO 301B or CO 301C or JTC 300 or LB 300.

Delivery:

Instructor: Megan Jones